WHY DOES EVIL EXIST

Lucifer’s rebellion, seen by all, would affect some of the heavenly assembly, but not all.

Its effects would not, however, be seen until the time of the end.  God, of course, would

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and did know in whose being this traitorous act had sunk its deep roots, but this would not be apparent to the other beings of the realm until this traitorous act had run its full course.      Anyone who has done any gardening knows that seedlings look a lot alike before they grow and develop into plants. It is not until they obtain some maturity that they start to visibly differ one from another. As another example, let us say a man abuses his wife and that he has a child. This child observes this abuse. How will it affect him? Will the effect be seen as he is a child, or will it be years later, when as an adult, he is married and has his own wife? The law of averages says he will, himself, become an abuser. One might say a seed was planted when he observed the abuse as a child, and later the seed of abuse sprung to full growth when he grew up and took a wife. Could anyone have looked at the child and known that he would grow up to be an abuser?  No, it takes time for this abuse (sin) to mature and to grow to its full-blown proportions.  This is the same principle as has taken place among the beings of the spiritual realm. Observing the traitorous act planted a seed among the beings of the spiritual realm. Only in time would this traitorous act mature and the unaffected spiritual beings of the realm see the effect on those in whom this traitorous act had been allowed to harbor and take root. Once this traitorous act has run its full course and become manifest in all whom have allowed it to germinate, then Judgment, the End of Days, will occur. Hence, the reason justice has lingered so long. This is why suffering, sin, and misery occur, but it will have its day.

Theodicy is an attempt to resolve the evidential problem of evil by reconciling the traditional divine characteristics of omnibenevolence, omnipotence, and omniscience with the occurrence of evil or suffering in the world.

In Augustinian theodicy, an attempt is made to explain the probability of an omnipotent and omnibenevolent (or all-powerful and perfectly loving) God amid evidence of evil in the world. Augustine typically asserts that God is perfectly good, that He created the world out of nothing, and that evil is the result of the original sin of humans. The entry of evil into the world is explained as punishment for sin, its continued occurrence owing to the evil use of free will by humans. The Augustinian theodicy maintains that God is perfectly good and not responsible for evil or suffering.

Irenaean third century theodicy is an attempt to explain the probability of an omnipotent and omnibenevolent God in the face of evidence of evil in the world. Irenaean theodicy asserts that the world is the best of all possible worlds because it allows humans to fully develop. Most versions of the Irenaean theodicy propose that creation is incomplete, as humans are not yet fully developed, and experiencing evil and suffering is necessary for such development.

Interestingly, Irenaeus argued that for humans to have free will, God must be at an epistemic distance (or intellectual distance) from humans, far enough that belief in God remains a free choice. This may be why God seems so hidden at times.      Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and sheweth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them; And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me (Matthew 4:8-9).

Satan is the “god of this world” (2 Corinthians 4:4). Colossians chapter 1 also states that when we are saved, God “TRANSFERS” us out of the domain of darkness and into the Kingdom of His beloved son, in Whom there is redemption, the forgiveness of sins. From the point of the Fall, the Creation was transferred into the hands of Satan. Part of the plan of redemption is God’s work through the ages to reclaim the kingdoms of this world. We will talk more about this later. ?

Another way of saying the same thing, unknown author.

Why does God allow evil?”
Answer: The Bible describes God as holy (Isaiah 6:3), righteous (Psalm 7:11), just (Deuteronomy 32:4), and sovereign (Daniel 4:17-25). These attributes tell us the following about God: (1) God is capable of preventing evil, and (2) God desires to rid the universe of evil. So, if both of these are true, why does God allow evil? If God has the power to prevent evil and desires to prevent evil, why does He still allow evil? Perhaps a practical way to look at this question would be to consider some alternative ways people might have God run the world:
1) God could change everyone’s personality so that they cannot sin. This would also mean that we would not have a free will. We would not be able to choose right or wrong because we would be “programmed” to only do right. Had God chosen to do this, there would be no meaningful relationships between Him and His creation.
Instead, God made Adam and Eve innocent but with the ability to choose good or evil. Because of this, they could respond to His love and trust Him or choose to disobey. They chose to disobey. Because we live in a real world where we can choose our actions but not their consequences, their sin affected those who came after them (us). Similarly, our decisions to sin have an impact on us and those around us and those who will come after us.
2) God could compensate for people’s evil actions through supernatural intervention 100 percent of the time. God would stop a drunk driver from causing an automobile accident. God would stop a lazy construction worker from doing a substandard job on a house that would later cause grief to the homeowners. God would stop a father who is addicted to drugs or alcohol from doing any harm to his wife, children, or extended family. God would stop gunmen from robbing convenience stores. God would stop high school bullies from tormenting the brainy kids. God would stop thieves from shoplifting. And, yes, God would stop terrorists from flying airplanes into buildings.
While this solution sounds attractive, it would lose its attractiveness as soon as God’s intervention infringed on something we wanted to do. We want God to prevent horribly evil actions, but we are willing to let “lesser-evil” actions slide—not realizing that those “lesser-evil” actions are what usually lead to the “greater-evil” actions. Should God only stop actual sexual affairs, or should He also block our access to pornography or end any inappropriate, but not yet sexual, relationships? Should God stop “true” thieves, or should He also stop us from cheating on our taxes? Should God only stop murder, or should He also stop the “lesser-evil” actions done to people that lead them to commit murder? Should God only stop acts of terrorism, or should He also stop the indoctrination that transformed a person into a terrorist?
3) Another choice would be for God to judge and remove those who choose to commit evil acts. The problem with this possibility is that there would be no one left, for God would have to remove us all. We all sin and commit evil acts (Romans 3:23; Ecclesiastes 7:20; 1 John 1:8). While some people are more evil than others, where would God draw the line? Ultimately, all evil causes harm to others.
Instead of these options, God has chosen to create a “real” world in which real choices have real consequences. In this real world of ours, our actions affect others. Because of Adam’s choice to sin, the world now lives under the curse, and we are all born with a sin nature (Romans 5:12). There will one day come a time when God will judge the sin in this world and make all things new, but He is purposely “delaying” in order to allow more time for people to repent so that He will not need to condemn them (2 Peter 3:9). Until then, He IS concerned about evil. When He created the Old Testament laws, the goal was to discourage and punish evil. He judges nations and rulers who disregard justice and pursue evil. Likewise, in the New Testament, God states that it is the government’s responsibility to provide justice in order to protect the innocent from evil (Romans 13). He also promises severe consequences for those who commit evil acts, especially against the “innocent” (Mark 9:36-42).
In summary, we live in a real world where our good and evil actions have direct consequences and indirect consequences upon us and those around us. God’s desire is that for all of our sakes we would obey Him that it might be well with us (Deuteronomy 5:29). Instead, what happens is that we choose our own way, and then we blame God for not doing anything about it. Such is the heart of sinful man. But Jesus came to change men’s hearts through the power of the Holy Spirit, and He does this for those who will turn from evil and call on Him to save them from their sin and its consequences (2 Corinthians 5:17). God does prevent and restrain some acts of evil. This world would be MUCH WORSE were not God restraining evil. At the same time, God has given us the ability to choose good and evil, and when we choose evil, He allows us, and those around us, to suffer the consequences of evil. Rather than blaming God and questioning God on why He does not prevent all evil, we should be about the business of proclaiming the cure for evil and its consequences—Jesus Christ!

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